Barcelona: Sagrada Familia, Part 2

We’re back home now, but there’s still lots more to discuss about Sagrada Familia. I left off the last post talking about the Passion facade, which was to be sculpted by Josep Subirachs. He has been quoted as saying that he departed from Gaudi’s style out of his deep respect for Gaudi’s work. He wanted his work to be compelling as well, but he didn’t think it was respectful to copy his style. The Passion facade, like the Nativity facade, tells a story through carvings. I’ll summarize a few with pictures in this post:

Here’s a sculpture of Judas kissing Jesus. You’ll notice to the left by their feet, there’s a square with numbers carved into it. Subirachs put in this “magic square” to pay homage to Jesus. There are 310 ways to add the numbers in the square up to 33, the age of Jesus at his death.

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
Another image, this one of the soldiers rolling dice for Jesus’ personal belongings:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
This carving of Jesus on his way to his crucifixion is significant in that Subirachs pays homage to Gaudi here by carving his likeness on the figure to the far left of the picture:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
A couple of pictures of Jesus tied to a column being whipped:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
Subirachs carved in a channel of tears to the side of Jesus’ face in this sculpture:

Barcelona: Sagrada FamiliaSubirachs was asked to craft the doors for Sagrada Familia. He chose to make them entirely from brass. Some pretty heavy doors:

Barcelona: Sagrada FamiliaInside the main apse, the entire ceiling isn’t even completed yet, but this gives you some idea of the size:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
The ceiling has incredible detail, symbolizing a forest full of trees, with light filtering in between them:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia
Closing this post, here’s a picture of our main hangout in Barcelona. This is Cafe Zurich, located at the top of La Rambla, at the Southeast corner of Placa Catalunya. I hate coffee, but their Cafe con Leche and Canya (pastry, like a bear claw, covered with powdered sugar and filled with fresh pastry cream) are awesome. Place is always packed:

Barcelona: Sagrada Familia

About the Author

My goal in life is to fill my family’s passports with stamps, creating buckets of memories along the way. You’ll find me writing about realistic ways for normal people to travel the world, whether you’re on a budget or enjoy luxury. I also enjoy taking us on the occasional detour to explore the inner workings of the travel industry.

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